Andromeda Galaxy, on Collision Course With the Milky Way, Has a Cannibalistic History: Researchers

Australian researchers have discovered that Andromeda, our neighbouring giant galaxy, has a historical past of consuming galaxies going again 10 billion years.

Worldwide analysis revealed on Thursday, which was co-led by Australian Nationwide College (ANU) and the College of Sydney, discovered that Andromeda, which is on a collision course with the Milky Method, has a cannibalistic historical past, reported Xinhua information company.

“The Milky Way is on a collision course with Andromeda in about four billion years. So knowing what kind of a monster our galaxy is up against is useful in finding out the Milky Way’s ultimate fate,” ANU’s Dougal Mackey stated in a media launch.

“Andromeda has a much bigger and more complex stellar halo than the Milky Way, which indicates that it has cannibalised many more galaxies, possibly larger ones.”

The analysis staff additionally discovered very faint traces of extra small galaxies that Andromeda devoured up even earlier, maybe way back to 10 billion years when it was first forming.

In line with the analysis, the indicators of historical feasting are written within the stars orbiting Andromeda, with the staff learning dense teams of stars, generally known as globular clusters, to disclose the traditional meal instances.

The invention presents a number of new mysteries, with the 2 bouts of galactic feeding coming from fully completely different instructions.

“This is very weird and suggests that the extragalactic meals are fed from what’s known as the ‘cosmic web’ of matter that threads the universe,” Geraint Lewis from the College of Sydney stated.

“More surprising is the discovery that the direction of the ancient feeding is the same as the bizarre ‘plane of satellites’, an unexpected alignment of dwarf galaxies orbiting Andromeda.”

Mackey stated learning Andromeda additionally knowledgeable understanding about the way in which our galaxy has grown and developed over many billions of years.

“One of our main motivations in studying astronomy is to understand our place in the Universe. A way of learning about our galaxy is to study others that are similar to it, and try to understand how these systems formed and evolved.”

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